Occupational Asthma Reference

Hollander A, Heederik D, Brunekreef B, Work-Related Changes In Peak Expiratory Flow Among Laboratory Animal Workers, Eur Respir J, 1998;11:929-936,

Keywords:

Known Authors

Dick Heederik, Institute of Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht Dick Heederik

Bert Brunekreef, Utrecht University, Netherlands Bert Brunekreef

If you would like to become a known author and have your picture displayed along with your papers then please get in touch from the contact page. Known authors can choose to receive emails when their papers receive comments.

Abstract

Laboratory animal workers are at risk of developing allergic symptoms, of which asthmatic symptoms are the most severe. The aim was to study the relationship between allergic symptoms due to working with rats and variability and changes in peak expiratory flow (PEF). Several indices were used on the basis of the amplitude of the PEF or the differences in PEF between days with and without exposure to rat aeroallergens. Of the 398 rat workers, 73% completed PEF readings on at least 9 days, of whom 208 had PEF readings on working days with and without contact with animals. The overall prevalence rate of allergic symptoms (asthmatic, eye, nose and/or skin) among rat workers during the handling of rats was 17.3%. Asthmatic symptoms were reported by 6.7%. The PEF of the workers who reported asthmatic symptoms due to working with rats decreased significantly on days working with the animals (difference between the minimum PEF averaged over working days with animals and over days without animals (deltaPEFmin-min) = -73 L x min(-1)), compared to the workers without symptoms (2.2 L x min(-1)). This effect was more pronounced among workers with a late asthmatic response, i.e. the presence of asthmatic symptoms several hours after working with rats (deltaPEFmin-min = -11.6 L x min(-1)). Multiple regression analyses showed that only those with asthmatic symptoms several hours after working with rats and those with allergic symptoms had an increased deltaPEFmin-min. In addition, workers with asthmatic symptoms were also more likely to have a higher PEF variability than workers without asthmatic symptoms. However, no difference in PEF variability between days with and without animals contact was observed. This study shows that the peak expiratory flow of workers who reported asthmatic symptoms due to working with rats decreased significantly on days working with laboratory animals.

Full Text

Associated Questions

There are no associations for this paper.

Please Log In or Register to put forward this reference as evidence to a question.

Bohrf Occupational Asthma Guidelines

This reference has been analysed as part of the BOHRF occupational asthma guidelines. Please click to view the Bohrf occupational asthma guideline data for this reference.

Comments

Please sign in or register to add your thoughts.


Oasys and occupational asthma smoke logo