Occupational Asthma Reference

Siracusa A, Folletti I, Gerth van Wijk R, Jeebhay MF, Moscato G, Quirce S, Raulf M, Ruëff F, Walusiak-Skorupa J, Whitaker P, Tarlo SM., Occupational anaphylaxis – an EAACI task force consensus statement., Allergy, 2015;70:141-152,
(Plain text: Siracusa A, Folletti I, Gerth van Wijk R, Jeebhay MF, Moscato G, Quirce S, Raulf M, Rueff F, Walusiak-Skorupa J, Whitaker P, Tarlo SM., Occupational anaphylaxis - an EAACI task force consensus statement., Allergy)

Keywords: Occupational anaphylaxis, review, latex, bee,

Known Authors

Mohammed Jeebhay, Cape Town Mohammed Jeebhay

Giana Moscato, Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Pavia Giana Moscato

Santiago Quirce, Madrid Santiago Quirce

Andrea Siracusa, Perugia Andrea Siracusa

Susan Tarlo, Toronto Susan Tarlo

Ilenia Folletti, Perugia Ilenia Folletti

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Abstract

Anaphylaxis is a systemic allergic reaction, potentially life-threatening that can be due to nonoccupational or, less commonly, to occupational triggers. Occupational anaphylaxis (OcAn) could be defined as anaphylaxis arising out of triggers and conditions attributable to a particular work environment. Hymenoptera stings and natural rubber latex are the commonest triggers of OcAn. Other triggers include food, medications, insect/mammal/snake bites, and chemicals. The underlying mechanisms of anaphylactic reactions due to occupational exposure are usually IgE-mediated and less frequently non-IgE-mediated allergy or nonallergic. Some aspects of work-related allergen exposure, such as route and frequency of exposure, type of allergens, and cofactors may explain the variability of symptoms in contrast to the nonoccupational setting. When assessing OcAn, both confirmation of the diagnosis of anaphylactic reaction and identification of the trigger are required. Prevention of further episodes is important and is based on removal from further exposure. Workers with a history of OcAn should immediately be provided with a written emergency management plan and an adrenaline auto-injector and educated to its use. Immunotherapy is recommended only for OcAn due to Hymenoptera stings.

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Comments

This is a useful review of occupational anaphylaxis. As expected the main causes are latex and bee stings. This is a consensus statement rather than an evidence-based review, which is a pitty, as few individuals are likely to have much experience with occupational anaphylaxis outside latex and bee stings, where the management is often similar to non-occupational anaphlaxis to the same agents
2/9/2015

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