Occupational Asthma Reference

Lota HK, Keir GJ, Hansell DM, Nicholson AG, Maher TM, Wells AU, Renzoni EA, Novel use of rituximab in hypersensitivity pneumonitis refractory to conventional treatment, Thorax, 2013;68:780-781,

Keywords: UK, EAA, rituximab, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, cryptogenic, case report, histology

Known Authors

David Hansell, Royal Brompton Hospital, London David Hansell

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Abstract

Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is treated by removal of the inciting antigen, if identified, and with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents in extensive or progressive disease. A minority of patients continue to decline and suffer outcomes comparable to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Rituximab, a B cell depleting anti-CD20 antibody, has shown benefit in interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) associated with connective tissue diseases (CTDs).1–3 We report a novel use of rituximab in a case of HP refractory to conventional treatment.

A 57-year-old female never-smoker, with no previous medical history, presented with a 6-month history of progressive breathlessness and dry cough. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) were impaired, with 26% of diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLco) and 44% of forced vital capacity (FVC). A high-resolution CT (HRCT) showed changes suggestive …

Plain text: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is treated by removal of the inciting antigen, if identified, and with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents in extensive or progressive disease. A minority of patients continue to decline and suffer outcomes comparable to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Rituximab, a B cell depleting anti-CD20 antibody, has shown benefit in interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) associated with connective tissue diseases (CTDs).1-3 We report a novel use of rituximab in a case of HP refractory to conventional treatment. A 57-year-old female never-smoker, with no previous medical history, presented with a 6-month history of progressive breathlessness and dry cough. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) were impaired, with 26% of diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLco) and 44% of forced vital capacity (FVC). A high-resolution CT (HRCT) showed changes suggestive ...

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