Occupational Asthma Reference

Dressel H, Gross C, de la Motte D, Sültz J, Jörres RA, Nowak D, Educational intervention decreases exhaled nitric oxide in farmers with occupational asthma, Eur Respir J, 2007;30:545-548,
(Plain text: Dressel H, Gross C, de la Motte D, Sultz J, Jorres RA, Nowak D, Educational intervention decreases exhaled nitric oxide in farmers with occupational asthma, Eur Respir J)

Keywords: occupational asthma, prevention, farmer, cow, storage mite, NO, Germany, allergen avoidance, education, pig, respiratory protective equiptment

Known Authors

Dennis Nowak, Institute fur Arbeits, Munich Dennis Nowak

Holger Dressel, Institute of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Munich Holger Dressel

If you would like to become a known author and have your picture displayed along with your papers then please get in touch from the contact page. Known authors can choose to receive emails when their papers receive comments.

Abstract

Allergic occupational asthma is frequent in farming populations. As educational interventions can improve disease management, the short-term effect of an educational intervention in asthmatic farmers was evaluated on the basis of spirometric indices and exhaled nitric oxide fraction (FeNO).

Farmers with occupational asthma (n = 81), mostly sensitised against cow dander and storage mites, participated in a 1-day educational programme. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and after 4–6 weeks, using FeNO, lung function and a questionnaire. Results were compared with those of a control group without intervention (n = 24).

In the educational group, the proportion of subjects reporting work-related symptoms was reduced after the intervention. The FeNO decreased from a geometric mean of 28.2 to 25.7 ppb, and, in subjects with an elevated (>35 ppb) baseline FeNO (n = 32), from 59.7 to 49.2 ppb. The corresponding changes in the control group were 25.6 versus 27.7 ppb and 49.5 versus 48.1 ppb. Spirometric results were unaltered in the two groups.

Thus exhaled nitric oxide fraction, a marker of allergic airway inflammation, indicated a beneficial effect of a short-term educational intervention in farmers with occupational asthma. This suggests a potential for exhaled nitric oxide fraction in assessing the efficacy of preventive measures within a short time with higher sensitivity than spirometry.


Plain text: Allergic occupational asthma is frequent in farming populations. As educational interventions can improve disease management, the short-term effect of an educational intervention in asthmatic farmers was evaluated on the basis of spirometric indices and exhaled nitric oxide fraction (FeNO). Farmers with occupational asthma (n = 81), mostly sensitised against cow dander and storage mites, participated in a 1-day educational programme. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and after 4-6 weeks, using FeNO, lung function and a questionnaire. Results were compared with those of a control group without intervention (n = 24). In the educational group, the proportion of subjects reporting work-related symptoms was reduced after the intervention. The FeNO decreased from a geometric mean of 28.2 to 25.7 ppb, and, in subjects with an elevated (>35 ppb) baseline FeNO (n = 32), from 59.7 to 49.2 ppb. The corresponding changes in the control group were 25.6 versus 27.7 ppb and 49.5 versus 48.1 ppb. Spirometric results were unaltered in the two groups. Thus exhaled nitric oxide fraction, a marker of allergic airway inflammation, indicated a beneficial effect of a short-term educational intervention in farmers with occupational asthma. This suggests a potential for exhaled nitric oxide fraction in assessing the efficacy of preventive measures within a short time with higher sensitivity than spirometry.

Full Text

Associated Questions

Registered users of this website have associated this reference with the following questions. This association is not a part of the BOHRF occupational asthma guidelines.

What evidence is there for the benefit of the enhanced use of respiratory protective equipment?
burgeps Education + RPE in farmers mainly with cow or pig occupational asthma. Increased use of RPE from 62-76% associated with some reduced symptoms and reduced FeNO, but only in those in whom it was raised beforehand

Please Log In or Register to put forward this reference as evidence to a question.

Comments

Please sign in or register to add your thoughts.


Oasys and occupational asthma smoke logo