Occupational Asthma Reference

Radon K, Rosenberger A, Ehrenstein V, Hoopmann M, Basting I, Tödt H, Reichert J, Dressel H, Schmid M, Suchenwirth R, Nowak D, Geographical distribution of acute symptoms after a train collision involving epichlorohydrin exposure, Environ Res, 2006;102:46-51,
(Plain text: Radon K, Rosenberger A, Ehrenstein V, Hoopmann M, Basting I, Todt H, Reichert J, Dressel H, Schmid M, Suchenwirth R, Nowak D, Geographical distribution of acute symptoms after a train collision involving epichlorohydrin exposure, Environ Res)

Keywords: Epichlorohydrin, acute exposure, irritant, accident

Known Authors

Dennis Nowak, Institute fur Arbeits, Munich Dennis Nowak

Holger Dressel, Institute of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Munich Holger Dressel

Katja Radon, Ludwig Maximillian University, Munich Katja Radon

If you would like to become a known author and have your picture displayed along with your papers then please get in touch from the contact page. Known authors can choose to receive emails when their papers receive comments.

Abstract

In September 2002, two freight trains collided in a northern German town. The inhabitants were potentially exposed to the probable human carcinogen epichlorohydrin. As no objective data on the level of exposure were available, we aimed to assess the geographical distribution of acute symptoms among local residents and subjects occupationally involved in the accident (e.g., firemen). A random sample of 932 adult local residents and 342 occupationally involved subjects were invited to answer a mail-in questionnaire. The main outcome measures were self-reported acute symptoms potentially associated with combustion products (e.g., irritation of the eyes, nose, or throat) and stress-related nonspecific symptoms. The main location during the first 26 h after the accident served as exposure proxy. For occupationally involved subjects, the time spent at the accident site was also used. The overall prevalence of symptoms potentially associated with combustion products was 9.8% for residents and 25.4% for occupationally involved subjects. After adjustment, subjects whose main location was close to the accident site had an increased risk for such symptoms. Among occupationally involved subjects the risk increased with duration at the accident site. Neither main location nor time at the accident site was significantly associated with non-specific symptoms. We could provide an example for designing and carrying out an epidemiologic study shortly after a local accident with potential public health impact. We could define parts of the population at increased risk for symptoms potentially specific for the exposure under study.

Full Text

Associated Questions

There are no associations for this paper.

Please Log In or Register to put forward this reference as evidence to a question.

Comments

Please sign in or register to add your thoughts.


Oasys and occupational asthma smoke logo