Occupational Asthma Reference

Martinelli A, Salamon F, Scapellato ML, Trevisan A, Vianello L, Bizzotto R, Crivellaro MA, Carrieri M, Occupational Exposure to Flour Dust. Exposure Assessment and Effectiveness of Control Measures, Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 2020;17:5182,doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145182

Keywords: baker, flour, italy, control, air measurements

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Abstract

The adverse effects associated with exposure to flour dust have been known since the 1700s. The aim of the study was to assess the occupational exposure to flour dust in Italian facilities, identify the activities characterized by the highest exposure, and provide information to reduce workers’ exposure. The study was performed in different facilities such as flourmills (n = 2), confectioneries (n = 2), bakeries (n = 24), and pizzerias (n = 2). Inhalable flour dust was assessed by personal and area samplings (n = 250) using IOM (Institute of Occupational Medicine) samplers. The results showed personal occupational exposure to flour dust over the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygiene (ACGIH) and the Scientific Committee on Occupational Exposure Limit (SCOEL) occupational limits (mean 1.987 mg/m3; range 0.093–14.055 mg/m3). The levels were significantly higher for dough makers in comparison to the dough formers and packaging area subjects. In four bakeries the industrial hygiene surveys were re-performed after some control measures, such as installation of a sleeve to the end of pipeline, a lid on the mixer tub or local exhaust ventilation system, were installed. The exposure levels were significantly lower than those measured before the introduction of control measures. The exposure level reduction was observed not only in the dough making area but also in all bakeries locals

Plain text: The adverse effects associated with exposure to flour dust have been known since the 1700s. The aim of the study was to assess the occupational exposure to flour dust in Italian facilities, identify the activities characterized by the highest exposure, and provide information to reduce workers' exposure. The study was performed in different facilities such as flourmills (n = 2), confectioneries (n = 2), bakeries (n = 24), and pizzerias (n = 2). Inhalable flour dust was assessed by personal and area samplings (n = 250) using IOM (Institute of Occupational Medicine) samplers. The results showed personal occupational exposure to flour dust over the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygiene (ACGIH) and the Scientific Committee on Occupational Exposure Limit (SCOEL) occupational limits (mean 1.987 mg/m3; range 0.093-14.055 mg/m3). The levels were significantly higher for dough makers in comparison to the dough formers and packaging area subjects. In four bakeries the industrial hygiene surveys were re-performed after some control measures, such as installation of a sleeve to the end of pipeline, a lid on the mixer tub or local exhaust ventilation system, were installed. The exposure levels were significantly lower than those measured before the introduction of control measures. The exposure level reduction was observed not only in the dough making area but also in all bakeries locals

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Comments

No mention of enzymes, flour measurements only. Fairly basic control methods
9/5/2020

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