Anaesthetic Agents

Super Categories

Subcategories

None

Known Synonyms

anaesthetic gases
Isoflourane
isofluorane
isoflurane
isolfurane, seveoflurane
Sevoflourane
sevoflurane

Table below is from one case report of a patient with occupational asthma. Specific Inhalation Challenge to anaesthetic agents is tricky as an anaesthetist needs to be present and the patient needs to stay awake.

Agent Anaesthetic agents (isoflourance and sevoflourane)
Job Anaesthetic assistant and nurse mostly exposed in recovery areas
Specific IgE
Skin prick test
Non-specific reactivity normal before challenge for 3 out of 3 patients and reactive in 3 out of 3 patients post challenge.
Serial Peak Flow 1 positive, 1 equivocal and 1 not done
Induced sputum
FENO
Specific Challenge

late reaction to isoflurane and sevoflurane 15 breaths 0.5% (1); late reaction isoflurane alone 18 breaths 0.5% (1); rash and nsbr decline isoflurane alone 18 breaths 0.5% (1); controls no reaction

Follow-up

Better after relocation away from recovering post-op patients exhaling anaesthetic gasses. One had anaphylactic reaction during a general anaesthetic using sevoflurane


References for: Anaesthetic Agents See published papers on "Anaesthetic Agents" from this website.

Oasys Notifications for Anaesthetic Agents

The Oasys Audit scheme started midway through 2010 and collects agents typed in through the Oasys program. The years before 2010 show old data entered during 2010 or later and are likely to have many fewer notifications. We expect Oasys to become more widely adopted as time goes by so increasing notifications does not necessarily mean an increasing problem.

Occupational asthma notifications to the Oasys Audit Scheme for Anaesthetic Agents

Selected References for Anaesthetic Agents

Abstract Available for BSACI guidelines for the investigation of suspected anaphylaxis during general anaesthesia Ewan PW, Dugué P, Mirakian R, Dixon TA, Harper JN, Nasser SM, BSACI guidelines for the investigation of suspected anaphylaxis during general anaesthesia, Clin Exp Allergy, 2010;40:15-31,

Full Text Available for Occupational asthma and allergy to sevoflurane and isoflurane in anaesthetic staff Vellore AD, Drought VJ, Sherwood-Jones D, Tunnicliffe B, Moore VC, Robertson AS, Burge PS, Occupational asthma and allergy to sevoflurane and isoflurane in anaesthetic staff, Allergy, 2006;61:1485-6,
Sherwood Burge, Oasys, an author of 'Occupational asthma and allergy to sevoflurane and isoflurane in anaesthetic staff' Vicki Drought, Oasys, an author of 'Occupational asthma and allergy to sevoflurane and isoflurane in anaesthetic staff' Vicky Moore, Oasys, an author of 'Occupational asthma and allergy to sevoflurane and isoflurane in anaesthetic staff' Alastair Robertson, Selly Oak Hospital, an author of 'Occupational asthma and allergy to sevoflurane and isoflurane in anaesthetic staff' Arun Dev Vellore, Oasys, an author of 'Occupational asthma and allergy to sevoflurane and isoflurane in anaesthetic staff' Bill Tunnicliffe, University Hospital Birmingham, an author of 'Occupational asthma and allergy to sevoflurane and isoflurane in anaesthetic staff'

Abstract Available for CS gas--implications for the anaesthetist Bhattacharya ST, Hayward AW, CS gas--implications for the anaesthetist, Anaesthesia, 1993;48:896-897,

Comments for Anaesthetic Agents

Please sign in or register to add your thoughts.


Oasys and occupational asthma smoke logo