Occupational Asthma Reference

Mortazavi R, Ariya PA, The impact of renovation on indoor airborne bacterial and fungal populations, Indoor Built Environ, 2017;26:1351-1361,10.1177/1420326x15610396

Keywords: building, renovation, refurbishment, microbiology, Canada

Known Authors

If you would like to become a known author and have your picture displayed along with your papers then please get in touch from the contact page. Known authors can choose to receive emails when their papers receive comments.

Abstract

We undertook an extensive study of population and type of viable microorganisms at several indoor construction sites in a 50-year-old chemical building which housed both laboratory and office spaces. Results were compared to neighbouring public buildings (office and shopping malls), as well as outdoor (green areas and traffic zones) in downtown Montreal, (45?°30'N, 73?°35'W). The highest number of microorganisms was observed in the major shopping street (bacteria: 602,865?cfu/m3; fungi: 109,612?cfu/m3). During moving/construction process, the mean population of airborne bacteria and fungi were 89,281 and 50,386?cfu/m3, respectively. Mean bacterial and fungal population in demolished laboratory sites were 37,127 and 17,679?cfu/m3, respectively. After the termination of laboratory renovations, continued elevation of airborne taxa population (bacteria: 25,635?cfu/m3; fungi: 6188?cfu/m3) was observed. At the construction site, the 16S rDNA sequence of bacteria isolates, R. equi, was identified as human pathogen and R. jostii RHA1 in an organic demolished laboratory site, with the ability to degrade a variety of xenobiotic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls. Our study showed that renovation/construction activities could create a distinct large pool of microorganisms that could be released into indoor environments which may persist even after the completion of renovations. Potential health effects and suggestions for future research are discussed in this paper.

Plain text: We undertook an extensive study of population and type of viable microorganisms at several indoor construction sites in a 50-year-old chemical building which housed both laboratory and office spaces. Results were compared to neighbouring public buildings (office and shopping malls), as well as outdoor (green areas and traffic zones) in downtown Montreal, (45 o30'N, 73 o35'W). The highest number of microorganisms was observed in the major shopping street (bacteria: 602,865 cfu/m3; fungi: 109,612 cfu/m3). During moving/construction process, the mean population of airborne bacteria and fungi were 89,281 and 50,386 cfu/m3, respectively. Mean bacterial and fungal population in demolished laboratory sites were 37,127 and 17,679 cfu/m3, respectively. After the termination of laboratory renovations, continued elevation of airborne taxa population (bacteria: 25,635 cfu/m3; fungi: 6188 cfu/m3) was observed. At the construction site, the 16S rDNA sequence of bacteria isolates, R. equi, was identified as human pathogen and R. jostii RHA1 in an organic demolished laboratory site, with the ability to degrade a variety of xenobiotic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls. Our study showed that renovation/construction activities could create a distinct large pool of microorganisms that could be released into indoor environments which may persist even after the completion of renovations. Potential health effects and suggestions for future research are discussed in this paper.

Full Text

Full text of this reference not available

Please Log In or Register to add the full text to this reference

Associated Questions

There are no associations for this paper.

Please Log In or Register to put forward this reference as evidence to a question.

Comments

We see patients who develop work-related asthma during building work, where the precise cause is usually unclear. This paper reports a study of air microbes during renovation of a building with laboratories. It showed an increase of cultivable bacteria in air during the renovation, which persisted after the building was reoccupied and spread to a neighbouring office block.
1/13/2018

Please sign in or register to add your thoughts.


Oasys and occupational asthma smoke logo